Upstate Replace: A Author’s “Layered,” Eclectic Catskills Farmhouse

Once we first featured the Catskills farmhouse of author Lisa Przystup, it was the summer time of 2017; the primary photo voltaic eclipse in a century was about to take over the sky and forged little moon-shaped shadows on the bottom; and Lisa and her husband, musician Jonathon Linaberry, then Brooklynites, had simply discovered an 1800s farmhouse on a hilltop in Delhi, New York, to function their weekend escape. It turned their weekend challenge, too: portray practically each inside floor creamy white, DIY-ing a brass backsplash within the kitchen, knocking out some partitions. We cherished the considerate, unfussy, pared-back nature of the place—although, Lisa advised us on the time, it was nonetheless a piece in progress.

So after we noticed up to date pictures on Jenni Kayne’s web site Rip & Tan, we figured it was time for a spherical of The place Are They Now: Upstate Farmhouse Version.

What’s modified? “SO a lot,” Lisa wrote to me by way of e-mail. “We had been nonetheless understanding how we’d be utilizing the home and what made sense for the area. After dwelling in a 500/600-square-foot railroad condominium [in Brooklyn] the place it felt like we had been dwelling on high of one another and buried below tchotchkes, it felt actually good to simply take a deep visible breath and go away room for area.

“I began hankering for layers and heat and texture at concerning the two yr mark—pillows and quilts and blankets and filling out nooks with issues. Additionally this magical factor finally ends up occurring the longer you’re in an area: You begin dwelling in it, like actually dwelling in it, and making recollections and including emotional layers—bits and items of recollections, drawings from my godsons, presents from household and mates, dried bits and items from nature walks—and that’s what actually begins to make the whole lot really feel crammed out.”

N.B: See Lisa’s e book  Upstate: Living Spaces with Space to Live, with pictures by Sarah Elliott.

Pictures by Christian Harder, courtesy of Rip & Tan.

three years ago, jonathon and a friend painstakingly removed the acoustic ceili 9
Above: Three years in the past, Jonathon and a good friend painstakingly eliminated the acoustic ceiling tiles within the kitchen and changed them with tongue-and-groove pine boards. “I feel the aesthetic I used to be drawn to after we first moved in was very sparse and minimal—loads of white and earth tones,” Lisa writes. “That felt good for a bit, however then I began actually digging that surprising quirky vibe that began occurring in interiors and wished to seek out items that may punctuate all that minimalism with pops of shade and a few eclectic-ish items with out going overboard or being too heavy-handed about it. Only a smattering of little issues to assist add character and life to that baseline we had set.”

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