How to Improve Your Home’s Indoor Air Quality

Danny Lipford, posed in this home bathroom, points to a box with a Broan-NuTone ventilation fan that he will install in his personal shower.
Want to breathe easily? Install a ventilation fan like this one in your bathrooms, home gym and laundry room.

New homes are more energy-efficient than ever, thanks to construction improvements that seal them tight. But these home-building innovations also negatively affect indoor air quality.

That’s because the latest construction techniques that keep outside air and water outdoors, where they belong, also trap stale, polluted air inside your home.   

Fortunately, it’s possible to enjoy the best of both worlds: an energy-efficient home with clean air to breathe. You just need to make some lifestyle adjustments and, possibly, some home improvements.


Closeup of steam rising from a stainless steel pot
No one wants the smell of last night’s cooking in the house today — not to mention the moisture, which can lead to mold and mildew. (©Adam, Adobe Stock Photos)

Sources of Pollution

All kinds of pollutants affect your home’s indoor air quality, but some are more common than others.

Think of how you cook food, and how you cool, heat and furnish each room. Oil, gas and kerosene are household necessities; so are coal and wood. And don’t forget about cleaning products, pesticides and paint packed with harmful chemicals.

Improving your home’s air usually boils down to controlling pollutants, improving

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